LINES OF THE DAY

". . . But the past does not exist independently from the present. Indeed, the past is only past because there is a present, just as I can point to something over there only because I am here. But nothing is inherently over there or here. In that sense, the past has no content. The past -- or more accurately, pastness -- is a position. Thus, in no way can we identify the past as past." p. 15

". . . But we may want to keep in mind that deeds and words are not as distinguishable as often we presume. History does not belong only to its narrators, professional or amateur. While some of us debate what history is or was, others take it into their own hands." p. 153

Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History (1995) by Michel-Rolph Trouillot

Friday, September 18, 2020

Thursday, September 17, 2020

Constitution Day

     . . . . Today is Constitution Day in the U.S.

Weep. Weep for all we have lost, when finally beginning to make progress.

In observance and honor of Constitution Day, the White House called a 'history' conference. They are calling it the "Patriot Commission."

https://www.forbes.com/sites/andrewsolender/2020/09/17/trump-launches-patriotic-education-commission-calls-1619-project-ideological-poison/#5704278c155a


Its goal is to eradicate any teaching of American history through the lens of the slave trade, slavery and genocide. Further is war on the 1619 Project.  They are saying that such teaching should be a treated as treason, i.e. a crime.

Further, hosting this kind of thing fits beautifully into shoggothinchief's* desire to run against Kamala Harris, rather than Joe Biden.

* The Guardian today, reporting on the latest woman to come forward describing being sexually assaulted by shoggothinchief, as "'It felt like tentacles': the women who accuse Trump of sexual misconduct"

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/sep/17/amy-dorris-donald-trump-women-who-accuse-sexual-misconduct

Wednesday, September 16, 2020

New Orleans! Survived Again! See You On The Second Line!

  . . . .Announcing NOLA Reconnect, a virtual visit to New Orleans and Acadiana, Oct. 2-4, 9-11, 16-17, 2020 -- video trailer just uploaded.

NOLA RECONNECT

A VIRTUAL VISIT TO NEW ORLEANS

A POSTMAMBO MUSIC SEMINAR

OCTOBER 2-4, 9-11, 16-17, 2020

VIDEO TRAILER HERE

INTIMATE, INTERACTIVE VISITS

WITH LIVE SOCIALLY DISTANCED MUSIC BY

(confirmed so far / in alphabetical order)

SHAMARR ALLEN

JAMES ANDREWS

JOHN BOUTTÉ

DAVID GREELY

COREY LEDET

DELFEAYO MARSALIS

LEYLA McCALLA

SOUL CREOLE TRIO

STANTON MOORE TRIO

HERLIN RILEY

SPECIAL GUEST FROM DETROIT

JOHN SINCLAIR w/ MARK BINGHAM

and

JASON BERRY

RICHARD CAMPANELLA

LOLIS ERIC ELIE

INA J. FANDRICH

MICHELLE N. GIBSON, THE ARTIST

LILY KEBER

BLACK FEATHER CHIEF COREY RAYFORD

NED SUBLETTE

MIA X

MORE NAMES TO BE ANNOUNCED

WRITERS, SCHOLARS, CHEFS, CHOREOGRAPHERS, AND MORE

ZOOM Q + A CALLS WITH ALL PRESENTERS / YOU ASK THE QUESTIONS

Produced by Ned Sublette for Postmambo +

Ariana Hall for CubaNOLA Arts Collective

REGISTRATION IS OPEN NOW,

CLOSES SEPTEMBER 30

THERE IS NO WEBSITE.  WRITE FOR PRICES AND OTHER INFORMATION: postmambo@gmail.com

* * *

AN OPEN LETTER FROM POSTMAMBO FOUNDER


NED SUBLETTE


September 16, 2020

“We can do it virtual,” said Ariana.

Back in March, the you-know-what forced us to cancel For the Funk of It, our first Postmambo New Orleans Music Seminar. That was a blow to my small company. Fully subscribed with 50 or so travelers, this group trip to New Orleans was gonna be the big one. For five years Postmambo had specialized in immersive, educational musical experiences on the ground in Cuba. This was to be our debut in the great music city of New Orleans.

We reanimated in July, after the initial shock of the pandemic had passed, when our distinguished producer on the ground in New Orleans, Ariana Hall of CubaNOLA Arts Collective, proposed doing a virtual visit instead. When our travelers said they were interested, we raced to make it real. And now we’re offering it to the public.

It’s all taking place over the first three weekends of October -- Oct. 2-4, 9-11, and 16-17 – with sessions in the afternoons and on Friday and Saturday nights. (Since it’s still hurricane season, rain dates are Oct. 23-24.) If you want to come with us, now’s the time to registerRegistration closes September 30, so hurry!

* * *

Things are bad for musicians right now in New Orleans, but there’s a lot going on during this lockdown.

This is a time to communicate. This is a time to support NOLA music and culture.

NOLA Reconnect. An interactive immersion in New Orleans, with a side trip to Acadiana. Intimate, shortish sets by major musical figures just for us, followed by Q & A, plus talks and gatherings with socially distanced writers, historians, cultural practitioners, food experts, and choreographers.

We’re still confirming participants, but as of right now we have confirmed (in alphabetical order):

*) performance by

SHAMARR ALLEN

JAMES ANDREWS

JOHN BOUTTÉ

DELFEAYO MARSALIS

LEYLA MCCALLA

STANTON MOORE TRIO

w/ JAMES SINGLETON + DAVID TORKANOWSKY

HERLIN RILEY

MORE NAMES TO BE ANNOUNCED!

*) Acadiana with

DAVID GREELY

COREY LEDET

SOUL CREOLE TRIO

*) special guest from Detroit JOHN SINCLAIR performing a new poem commissioned for the occasion, accompanied by MARK BINGHAM in Breaux Bridge.

*) interactions with artists, scholars, and practitioners, including

JASON BERRY

RICHARD CAMPANELLA

INA J. FANDRICH

LILY KEBER

BLACK FEATHER CHIEF COREY RAYFORD

NED SUBLETTE

*) cooking with

LOLIS ERIC ELIE

MIA X

*) dance with

MICHELLE N. GIBSON, THE ARTIST

MORE NAMES TO BE ANNOUNCED

info: postmambo@gmail.com

Even though we can’t wait to get back to physical travel, we’ve gotten excited about the new possibilities that virtual offers. These are not simply livestreams. It’s not TV. Every event is participatory, with live Q&A. And it’s not anonymous – we’re a group that talks to each other. New Orleans artists are exploring solutions for how to project their culture into the new social distance. Historians will help us frame our understanding of the city’s times and spaces. At night, there’ll be virtual cocktail parties -- we'll coach you on making a Sazerac -- so we can compare notes and hang.

Tired of long hours on the screen? So are we. We’re trying to improve the virtual experience. Concise and dense is our esthetic, and we’ll take long breaks to get the blood moving again.

Until we can travel freely again, Postmambo is a media company. In our first meeting with tech director Chris Butcher, he said (I’m paraphrasing): whatever happens with live music and whatever happens with the pandemic, virtual’s here to stay.

Chris is right. This is only the beginning. The tools are going to keep getting better. We have ideas. After we produce and evaluate this, we’ll announce our next offerings.

Programs are only available with full subscription to the entire eight days. No day passes, no à la cartes. But we’ll have a passworded archive up for three months afterwards so that registered travelers who miss a program can catch up.

Write for prices. I won’t lie, it’s not cheap. It can’t be. This is a live interactive experience custom-produced for our seminar group. We can’t keep giving music away and expect to pay the artists, producers, and support personnel. We’re at an “inflection point” not only in our terrifying present-day politics and social disintegration, but also in affirming that cultural work has value, and that artists deserve to be paid.

Reconnect with New Orleans together with us, virtually. It’s not a large group. We have room for you! Happy to answer any questions.

info: postmambo@gmail.com


Friday, September 11, 2020

Heavenly Perfume

     . . . . For the third week now, El V and B walked the three miles up and back to the Union Square Farmer's Market this afternoon.

El V asks B, "Why didn't we do this all summer long?"

B patiently answers, "Because it only re-opened a month ago."

I'm really glad for the stuff. But I wish ... el V understood that putting onions and garlic and shallots in the same bag with green stuff that gets washed and refreshed throughout the day is a wrong move. He has just learned that one cannot put away items like onions and so on wet. I will have to inform him of this many times before it penetrates. This must be how my mom must have felt teaching me to cook, garden, laundry, sew, clean house, etc.

So pleased to have local celery. Am really hooked on fresh out of the dirt local celery. Also the apartment is perfumed now by the heavenly basil as the bunch's leaves dry, before I begin dealing with it. Heavenly basil, O O O O! Very Happy with the variety of mushrooms too. With them came a lot of dirt, or whatever the growing medium was.

Now we have all the things on hand for this recipe, which we thought we'd try out early next week.

Gochugaru Chicken With Corn, Mushrooms and Zucchini



9/11 Commemoration Within Pandemic Times

     . . . . Another 9/11 anniversary commemoration has come around, an event that helped the arrival of even worse time we're having now. 

9/11 was our Big Break of Before and After in our lives (there are others too, but this covered it all from public-political, to economic-cultural, as well as personal).  This tore the gates off all our safeguards and protections for everything, allowing the full flood level of 1927 of cruelty, corruption, pillaging and oppression to take-over with no questions asked, as even frackin’ dems and libs bent over for it, behind the utterly transparent veil of patriotism and religion.  IOW, enabling the shoggothdeathcultmurdererinchief and the horrors he's unleashed and broken out from under the rocks to do murder and mayhem and hate with impunity.

To those who say, "I'm so over 9/11. So many are alive now who weren't even born then," I say, FUCK YOU.  You're just like all those who think we should allow everyone who isn't under 50 to die of the pandemic because, you know, move over, you're over, you are nothing, nothing at all compared to us who are under 40.  

Also, SHAME ON YOU. You have revealed yourself to be a self-centered, narcissist pos, like so many, which is why this country can't have nice things.  We're always all about oneself, never about a community, much less, you know, a nation.


Thursday, September 10, 2020

Martin Walker: The Shooting at Château Rock

     . . . . Thanks to the opening of the library branch's  Grab 'n Go program, I have received the very last published volume in Martin Walker's Bruno Chief of Police series, published in May (2020), #18, The Shooting at Château Rock. Chief Bruno and the fluctuating cast of St. Denis and the Périgord region have been an ongoing part of my life since the later part of June. There's no gift more desirable to reader, than the discovery of a multi-volume series in which all the titles have already been published.




I wonder if there will be any more Chief Brunos. I can see Walker successfully creating more titles in the series set plausibly in the covid-19 era. his might not be the case for every series going by any means, particularly one with as many titles and regular, established characters and relationships. In this series though, it’s not as if Europe, France and this region of France haven’t suffered dreadfully in pandemics in the past.

One of Chief Bruno's French Basset boys typical positions, requesting tummy rubs from humans they like -- especially women.  Supposedly this is the breed from which George Washington received his own pack of hunting hounds from Europe. Like the varieties of wine that pour through the Bruno novels, so dogs, horses, cows, sheep chickens, geese, donkeys,  even snakes. 


Bruno's Balzac, his second basset, at two years, should now begin his duty to continue the breed, something only Martin Walker would have thought of as part of a police tale's story? Particularly as it seems French Basset males can need some human help in getting 'er done, particularly the first time. (Which to my mind never bodes well for the endurance of a breed of anything when it needs humans to have sex.)

An earlier post brings up the large place in these books taken by agriculture at large, wine making and drinking, and the raising, cooking and eating of food in convivial circumstances.  just the châteaux of the the Loire Valley have very long been the fantasy ideal of fairy tale castles, Walker’s St. Denis of the Dordogne is a French fairyland world, in which a community retains traditional cultural ways practiced 


for centuries, where all its vastly long history exists on top, around and through the present, where so much daily life is good (not to mention delicious), a world that is carefully cared for and nourished by its officialdom top down, from mayor and wealthy residents, to, above all, its Chief of Police, who operates almost like St. Denis’s personal guardian angel. Even so, very bad things happen there.

The region is always in flux.  In past it suffered invasions since at least the days of the Phoenicians; these days it suffers -- and prospers -- by floods of outsiders, whether summer residents from England who come to stay, tourists from the entire world or day trippers from Paris. From this flood emerge an endless procession of bad guys, whether as legacy from France's colonial evils, its Nazi occupation, or new ones that have blossomed on their own, such as the Russian oligarchs. Yet, there's always a purely local connection that brings them to Bruno's St. Denis, as befits the pull of the region human beings have inhabited continuously longer than anywhere else in Europe -- and before them, and co-habiting with Neanderthals too.  Whether newly discovered Neanderthal grave sites, the Caves of Lascaux, to what is embedded in the thousands of years of eating and drinking, this is as much a cradle of civilization as Mesopotamia or the Ganges.

The EU almost functions as the highway for the very bad things' presence. I like so much that the EU is a constant reference in the book. Its rules, regulations, trade agreements. and evidently its power, at least as regarded by the residents of a rural community, is in the way of them making a living. It is almost always outsiders that are the actors for the bad events.

The series may not be the best writing or even the best series, perhaps? but it was reliably engaging, and unpredictably quirky through out. The quirks are what makes its formula feel awake, not tired.  Original, yet formulaic enough, new books could trace pathways within the pandemic as it was / is happening in France, to deepen the community's relationships, official and personal, and provide new interests and development in the characters. This isn't literature, but it is terrific story telling, keeping us coming back for more, always wanting to know more.  The reader quite becomes part of the community. If we are fortunate enough to enter into such a community, becomes a part of it, so we are always interested in our friends and neighbors of St. Denis.  That's quite a lot of accomplishment -- the author should be pleased and proud.